Extra! Bob Dylan & his band, RAH, 21st October

“Why can’t I be more conventional
People talk
People stare
So I try
But that’s not for me…”
– “Why Try to Change Me Now”, covered on Shadows in the Night

These things we know: that Bob has a great band, from the rock steady rhythm section, equally at home with brushes and bows as sticks and fingers – to the dazzling front line of guitar and pedal steel; that he has an unsurpassed choice of songs to sing; that he won’t respond to requests no matter how many times the audience shouts out their particular favourite song; that he will always be his own man, ploughing his own furrow.

This we didn’t know: that he could sing, live in concert, timeless songs of the 40’s and 50’s with a believable, vulnerable – but above all careful – voice.

It made him less cavalier with his own songs, too, and the contrast of the pedal steel and brushes-driven Sinatra songs gave his 21st century blues numbers more snap and bite – “Pay In Blood” was terrifying, phrase after phrase flung from the stage like Muddy Waters backed by Johnny Winter; “Long and Wasted Years” becoming a second cousin of “Brownsville Girl”, both in melody and narrative delivery.

He pays homage to the American music that still fuels him in the way he chooses to walk onto the stage. The first half kicked off with guitarist Stu Kimball playing an acoustic piece of western folk (think the “Pat Garrett“ soundtrack, or “Red River Valley”) as the rest of the band filed on. For the second half Kimball played an electric country blues, Mississippi via Chicago, for the band’s entrance. As he said in Chronicles, “Highway 61, the main thoroughfare of the country blues, begins about where I began. I always felt like I’d started on it, always had been on it and could go anywhere, even down in to the deep Delta country. It was my place in the universe, always felt like it was in my blood.”

I also thought of this quote, said when he was 21 and talking of the tradition that he wanted to work in… “I don’t carry myself yet the way that Big Joe Williams, Woody Guthrie, Leadbelly and Lightnin’ Hopkins have carried themselves. I hope to be able to someday, but they’re older people. You see, in time, with those old singers, music was a tool – a way to live more, a way to make themselves feel better at certain points.”

And even at his most forward-thinking, smashing the conventions of popular song, there would always be the blues: “Leopard Skin Pillbox Hat”, “Highway 61”, “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry”. You wonder what his 1966 self would make of him singing Sinatra at the Albert Hall in 2015. I bet he’d be fine with it. He was 1966 in 1966, and he didn’t need to be that again. He’d be pleased that he still honoured his roots every night that he plays, whether it’s Crosby and Sinatra, Wolf and Waters, or Williams, Holly and Berry. And, as he encored – with a wonderfully rolling and tumbling, piano-led version of “Blowin’ in the Wind” that was almost-country (but mostly Bob), and a coruscating “Love Sick” – I kept coming back to that verse from “Why Try to Change Me Now”. It struck me as both the fulcrum of the night’s set, and of his entire enormous, chaotic, poetic, mind-blowing, career.

Comments

  1. Thanks Martin for such a fond and measured review. I’m seeing the great man tonight – amazing how, for him, any pretence i have at being cool goes out the window! Regards Thom.

    • What did you think, Thom?

      • I absolutely loved it. I found the ‘vintage’songs very moving – Bob, once so imperious, adopting the role of the supplicant. This had an impact on the way he handled Tangled and She Belongs To Me recasting them in a more autumnal light that again i found moving. Above all he remained inscrutably 100 per cent Bob and that will always be more than good enough for me! Thom

  2. Martin I love this review. Your writing reads like Dylan, makes me feel the same way as listening to Bob does. Beautiful

  3. I agree with Hedda. And with Thom. And with you, Martin.

    • Extremely nice of you to say. Have you listened to the version of “Hattie Carroll” in the music player, Richard? I know next to nothing about the players but I love their album of Bob songs.

  4. mick gold says:

    Brownsville Girl! So glad you heard it too. I was sitting next to my friend John who wanted to yell Brownsville Girl! in a bizarre attempt to get his fave Dylan song played live. But he didn’t. After Long & Wasted Years, I said to him, “That was very close to your request.” Insidious stop start rhythm. Wonderful to hear Bob sing Early Roman Kings & I’m A Fool To Want You and nail them both to the wall.

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